Publications

Rethinking Public Innovation
Jocelyne Bourgon, June 2017


“Innovation in government has received much attention over the years. For the most part, the focus has been introspective, giving special attention to the modernisation of public sector systems and practices as well as the service delivery functions of government. The focus of attention in these conversations is on innovation ...

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“Innovation in government has received much attention over the years. For the most part, the focus has been introspective, giving special attention to the modernisation of public sector systems and practices as well as the service delivery functions of government. The focus of attention in these conversations is on innovation in government and as a result may have missed the most important contributions of government to public innovation….”

The Federal Idea
Jocelyne Bourgon, December 2015


“Discussions about the division of powers in a federation are often difficult and controversial because vested interests are full of emotion. A few simple rules of engagement make these discussions easier and more productive. The first is to clarify the scope of discussion. Are the discussions about devolution taking place ...

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“Discussions about the division of powers in a federation are often difficult and controversial because vested interests are full of emotion. A few simple rules of engagement make these discussions easier and more productive.

The first is to clarify the scope of discussion. Are the discussions about devolution taking place within the context of the existing constitution or are constitutional amendments also envisaged?”

Distinctively Public Sector: The Case for a New Synthesis of Public Administration
Jocelyne Bourgon, October 2015


“There is a need for a public sector narrative to lead public transformation. Public sector leaders must re-discover what makes government and public institutions unique and irreplaceable to build a prosperous and wellperforming society. This is needed to steer society through an unprecedented period of change. In a word, we ...

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“There is a need for a public sector narrative to lead public transformation. Public sector leaders must re-discover what makes government and public institutions unique and irreplaceable to build a prosperous and wellperforming society. This is needed to steer society through an unprecedented period of change.

In a word, we need a New Synthesis of public administration—one that brings together the contributions of government, citizens and multiple actors in society. One that can help practitioners think their way through the problems they are facing in practice and invent solutions to the problems we are facing as a society.”

Distinctively Public Sector: Leading Public Transformation
Jocelyne Bourgon, July 2015


“When much is in flux, when the ground is shifting and the future is uncertain, when things are getting moderately “unstuck,” this is a good time to rediscover some old truths and fundamental principles. One such old truth worth rediscovering is that public institutions do much more than administer laws, ...

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“When much is in flux, when the ground is shifting and the future is uncertain, when things are getting moderately “unstuck,” this is a good time to rediscover some old truths and fundamental principles. One such old truth worth rediscovering is that public institutions do much more than administer laws, programs and provide services. They serve a public purpose. This is what makes them unique and valuable to society. This is what gives meaning to the actions they take and the decisions they make.

At the most fundamental level, the role of the State and of public institutions is to shape a better future and improve human conditions.”

Serving as One
Jocelyne Bourgon, April 2015


“Leading transformation extends beyond public service reforms, which typically preserve the status-quo. It involves responding to the changing needs and expectations of citizens, and adapting to the rapidly changing landscape of the world we live in. Transformation in the public sector never ends. It is an on-going process that ensures ...

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“Leading transformation extends beyond public service reforms, which typically preserve the status-quo. It involves responding to the changing needs and expectations of citizens, and adapting to the rapidly changing landscape of the world we live in. Transformation in the public sector never ends. It is an on-going process that ensures that the civil service is able to face the challenges of the times.”

The Perspective of the CEO
Michel Bilodeau, April 2015


This paper provides the perspective of the CEO that launched a successful co-creation and co-production initiative to support children with complex diseases at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO). “I was CEO from 2006 to 2011 and, in this capacity, I had regular meetings with our Family Forum, a group ...

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This paper provides the perspective of the CEO that launched a successful co-creation and co-production initiative to support children with complex diseases at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO).

“I was CEO from 2006 to 2011 and, in this capacity, I had regular meetings with our Family Forum, a group of parents of children using CHEO’s services. In late fall 2008, during one of these meetings, parents talked about the burden of caring for children with very complex problems. I heard about the challenges facing families with very heavily handicapped children who needed to see up to fifteen different specialists, use life sustaining equipment, and receive services from CHEO as well as other establishments like the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Center (OCTC) (an outpatient rehabilitation service) and the Community Care Access Center (CCAC) (home care) in addition to their regular paediatrician, frequent visits to the Emergency Room and occasional hospitalization. The case study provides data about the number of visits patients made to the various clinics, emergency room usage and days of hospitalisation.”

Co-creation and Co-production: Towards a Practical Approach
Rachael Calleja and Uri Marantz, March 2015


This paper provides a literature review of key positions on co-creation and co-production to date for the purpose of extracting practical guidance for practitioners. “Serving in the 21st century is more difficult than ever. The rising costs of health and social care, growing citizen expectations, and a shrinking revenue base ...

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This paper provides a literature review of key positions on co-creation and co-production to date for the purpose of extracting practical guidance for practitioners.

“Serving in the 21st century is more difficult than ever. The rising costs of health and social care, growing citizen expectations, and a shrinking revenue base are increasing the complexity of service provision. Now more than ever, governments are looking for innovative ways to deliver better public services at significantly lower costs.

Within this context, co-creation and co-production have been presented as promising avenues for governments to explore new methods of service provision beyond the conventional. At their core, these concepts are about acknowledging the potential for citizens to act as value creators and work with government to produce services of high public value.”

Health Care: Managed like the Private Sector?
Michel Bilodeau, March 2015


For years, public sector institutions have been told to act more like the private sector. Focussing specifically on health care, this paper highlights the uniqueness and strengths of the public sector, arguing that public institutions should not take their cues from the private sector. “There are good and bad organisation, ...

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For years, public sector institutions have been told to act more like the private sector. Focussing specifically on health care, this paper highlights the uniqueness and strengths of the public sector, arguing that public institutions should not take their cues from the private sector.

“There are good and bad organisation, good and bad managers, in both the private and the public sectors. It is too simplistic to postulate, as is too often the case with right wing advocates, that the private sector creates wealth and the public sector just wastes taxpayers’ money. A well performing public sector is essential for the development, the operation and the progress of society. But assessing the performance of the public sector is more complex and the criteria cannot be the same used for the private sector. A dynamic private sector and a well performing public sector are both essential for any society to thrive and provide a good standard of living to its citizens. Public sector managers should not manage as if they were in the private sector. Their goal is to serve the citizens of their country, not the owners of their company.”

Rule of Law and Voluntary Compliance
Rishanthi Pattiarachchi, March 2015


“Modern governments are facing new law enforcement challenges. Public policy issues of increasing complexity and a changing relationship between the State and citizens create murky waters for governments to navigate. Changing citizen’s expectations and behaviors mean that law enforcement is more challenging than before. The effectiveness of conventional practices ...

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“Modern governments are facing new law enforcement challenges. Public policy issues of increasing complexity and a changing relationship between the State and citizens create murky waters for governments to navigate. Changing citizen’s expectations and behaviors mean that law enforcement is more challenging than before. The effectiveness of conventional practices for regulatory enforcement has been a growing concern for many countries. “Inadequate compliance” has been identified as the main cause for regulatory failures in a number of developed countries

For many years, the basic understanding has been that Governments exercise a monopoly over law making and law enforcement. The State acts as the guardian of the collective interest. Citizens voluntarily accept to obey the laws that the State promulgates because this behaviour serves their interest by ensuring public safety and maintaining an organised and secure society.”

Enforcement and Safety
Jocelyne Bourgon, March 2015


“A relationship of trust between government and citizens is a key factor in generating a law abiding society. It is not sufficient to make laws, launch new programs and provide public services. The conduct of rule makers, public servants and law enforcement officers must display their commitment to putting the ...

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“A relationship of trust between government and citizens is a key factor in generating a law abiding society. It is not sufficient to make laws, launch new programs and provide public services. The conduct of rule makers, public servants and law enforcement officers must display their commitment to putting the collective interest above all else, and they must themselves behave in accordance with the laws that they have the authority to promulgate and enforce.

Rule makers must act in a manner that elicits respect and encourages the voluntary compliance of citizens with the law. A law abiding society is one where people accept to be governed by laws. Without rules there is no order, and without law abiding citizens, there is no peace and no safety.”

Rule of Law, Citizenship and Enforcement Strategies
Jocelyne Bourgon with the assistance of Rishanthi Pattiarachchi, March 2015


This paper reviews fundamental concepts related to the rule of law and creating a law-abiding society. It provides practical observations and guiding principles to improve enforcement strategies. “An effective enforcement strategy provides concrete incentives for regulatees and appropriate guidelines for enforcement staff. It starts with clarity of purpose. It entails ...

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This paper reviews fundamental concepts related to the rule of law and creating a law-abiding society. It provides practical observations and guiding principles to improve enforcement strategies.

“An effective enforcement strategy provides concrete incentives for regulatees and appropriate guidelines for enforcement staff. It starts with clarity of purpose. It entails a sharing of responsibility between government, citizens and society. It encourages experimentation and learning. It monitors positive results and publicly reports on the reduction of harms.

A challenge for government is to develop and apply enforcement strategies that achieve the desired public outcomes while keeping regulatory costs and administrative burdens as low as possible. This paper reviews key concepts relevant to crafting enforcement strategies. It brings together foundational ideas, recent academic works and emerging practices. It proposes a road map for practitioners who shoulder the responsibility of crafting enforcement strategies”.

Innovation in Government or Public Innovation?
Rachael Calleja, February 2015


This paper moves beyond innovation in government to a broader focus on the capacity of public institutions to explore and engage in public innovation. “Serving in the 21st century is more difficult than ever.1 Today’s public servants are called to face a number of increasingly complex and ‘wicked’ challenges ...

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This paper moves beyond innovation in government to a broader focus on the capacity of public institutions to explore and engage in public innovation.

Serving in the 21st century is more difficult than ever.1 Today’s public servants are called to face a number of increasingly complex and ‘wicked’ challenges during a time defined by declining resources, rules and restrictions, and weakening citizen trust. 2 As globalisation and the rise of IC technologies change the context of governing, governments are increasingly being called upon to find new and innovative ways to meet the changing needs of citizens.

All governments innovate. Public sector innovations have shaped the societies we live in and have given rise to the government models currently in place. While all governments innovate, not all governments actively engage in public innovation. The distinction is subtle, but significant.”

Public Innovation and Public Purpose
Jocelyne Bourgon, January 2015


“In November 2014, the OECD held a conference on innovation in government (“Innovating the Public Sector: from Ideas to Actions”). I chaired a session (see section below for details) in which we explored the inter-relationship between innovation in the public sector (that is, improving systems, practices and service delivery functions) and ...

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“In November 2014, the OECD held a conference on innovation in government (“Innovating the Public Sector: from Ideas to Actions”). I chaired a session (see section below for details) in which we explored the inter-relationship between innovation in the public sector (that is, improving systems, practices and service delivery functions) and public innovation (the capacity of government to invent solutions to the challenges we face as a society). The OECD published my opening remarks in an article called “Innovation in the Public Sector or Public Innovation?” This paper expands on that article.

Innovation in the public sector has received much attention over the years. The focus is introspective. Efforts contributed to the modernization of government services, in particular through the introduction and use of modern information and communication technologies (ICTs), and paid greater attention to user satisfaction. Worthy as they are, these innovations are unlikely to keep pace with the increasing complexity of our changing society. We need something else, something more.”

Innovation in the Public Sector or Public Innovation?
Jocelyne Bourgon, November 2014


“Government innovates. We owe to public institutions many of the innovations that have given shape to the societies we live in today. They have given us the nation state and the rule of law. They have created the policies and programs that have contributed to building societal solidarity–from public ...

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“Government innovates. We owe to public institutions many of the innovations that have given shape to the societies we live in today. They have given us the nation state and the rule of law. They have created the policies and programs that have contributed to building societal solidarity–from public health and public education systems, to public pension and support programs to assist citizens most in need.

They have generated the laws necessary for a market economy to flourish, from corporate laws to intellectual property and the regulation of financial institutions. They have built the infrastructures needed for a modern society and economy to develop including the roads, harbours, airports, as well as the modern information and communication infrastructures.”

Leading Transformation: The New Synthesis in Action
Jocelyne Bourgon, October 2014


This paper provides a short overview of the New Synthesis (NS) Initiative.  It describes the lenses of positioning, leveraging and engaging, and highlights powerful implications of the NS Framework in practice. “The New Synthesis Initiative was launched five years ago to help close the gap between conventional theory of public ...

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This paper provides a short overview of the New Synthesis (NS) Initiative.  It describes the lenses of positioning, leveraging and engaging, and highlights powerful implications of the NS Framework in practice.

“The New Synthesis Initiative was launched five years ago to help close the gap between conventional theory of public administration and the realities of public service in practice.

Two years later, we developed a conceptual framework that is substantially different from the traditional model of public administration inherited from the industrial age. The New Synthesis Framework is “distinctly public sector.”

The NS Framework is intended to serve as a road map to guide practitioners as they explore the range of options that government can use to solve real-life challenges. But the road map is not the journey. Civil servants must craft their own narratives of change. They must invent a New Synthesis adapted to their own unique context and circumstances. Different choices will set countries on different trajectories and will have a significant impact on their overall performance.”

Leading from the Centre of Government
Jocelyne Bourgon, September 2014


“The Centre of Government (CoG) has received insufficient attention in the public sector reforms of the past 10-15 years and yet… There is no good governance without good government—governments able to frame an ambitious agenda for their country and to fulfill it in a manner that deserves public support. ...

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“The Centre of Government (CoG) has received insufficient attention in the public sector reforms of the past 10-15 years and yet…

There is no good governance without good government—governments able to frame an ambitious agenda for their country and to fulfill it in a manner that deserves public support.

There is no effective government without:

  • The capacity to bring coherence to government actions and decisions;
  • The capacity to set priorities and mobilise human and financial resources to support them; or
  • The capacity to ensure that a number of elements (some inside government and many outside) collaborate to propel society forward.

These are the raison d’être of the CoG. The Centre of Government, in this context, is not one person or a single unit. The CoG is polycentric. It includes the functions needed to support the Head of Government (HoG), to serve the Council of Ministers (CoM) and act as a steward for the public service—wherever these functions may reside.”

Government Fit for the Time
Jocelyne Bourgon, September 2014


“What would happen if we could blend together powerful examples of how governments go about solving intractable problems in various parts of the world, new findings from a variety of academic disciplines, and conventional practice in public administration of enduring value? The result would be a roadmap that is quite ...

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“What would happen if we could blend together powerful examples of how governments go about solving intractable problems in various parts of the world, new findings from a variety of academic disciplines, and conventional practice in public administration of enduring value?

The result would be a roadmap that is quite different from conventional approaches. It would be a synthesis of old and new ideas, traditional practices and new approaches that are better adapted to the changing landscape of the world we live in. This is the essence of the New Synthesis Initiative.

A roadmap is not a journey. The journey can only take shape in the context and circumstances that are unique to each country.”

A Centre of Government Fit for the Time
Jocelyne Bourgon, September 2014


“This paper adopts a functional definition of the CoG, understanding the CoG as the units that perform specified functions regardless of their location within the machinery of government. The remainder of this paper elaborates on the key functions performed by the centre in serving the HoG, the CoM, and in ...

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“This paper adopts a functional definition of the CoG, understanding the CoG as the units that perform specified functions regardless of their location within the machinery of government.

The remainder of this paper elaborates on the key functions performed by the centre in serving the HoG, the CoM, and in leading the professional public service. It frames lines of inquiry to think about the role of the CoG and the responsibilities needed to adapt to changing needs and circumstances.”

Leadership: An Integrated Process of Change
Jocelyne Bourgon, September 2014


“Leadership in the public sector has long been neglected. At first, the view was that leadership is the same in any setting, public or private. Public sector managers were encouraged to run the public sector like a business, and to take their inspiration from the champion of industries. Over time, ...

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“Leadership in the public sector has long been neglected. At first, the view was that leadership is the same in any setting, public or private. Public sector managers were encouraged to run the public sector like a business, and to take their inspiration from the champion of industries. Over time, it was realised that public sector leadership has a number of unique characteristics and serves a distinct purpose.”

Distinctively Public Sector
Jocelyne Bourgon, September 2014


“Since introducing the NS Framework in 2012, we have tested the application of the NS Framework with practitioners. To do so, we designed an NS Master Class program and two NS Workshops, one for the most senior civil servants and one for junior managers. The Workshops were designed as an applied ...

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“Since introducing the NS Framework in 2012, we have tested the application of the NS Framework with practitioners. To do so, we designed an NS Master Class program and two NS Workshops, one for the most senior civil servants and one for junior managers. The Workshops were designed as an applied discovery process to allow practitioners to explore the NS Framework in the context of the real-life challenges they were facing in their daily work.

The Workshops used four lenses through which participants explored the various dimensions of the New Synthesis Framework:

  • Positioning to benefit from a broader mental map.
  • Leveraging the power of others.
  • Engaging the contribution of citizens as value creators.
  • Synthesising a powerful narrative of change The Workshops ran from 3 to 6 days and were each tested in at least two countries to assess their relevance in various contexts and domains of practice.

Today, I will share the insights we gained through the Workshops and the lessons that participants taught us. These lessons are a useful barometer of the issues at play in various countries and the work needed to prepare public institutions to be fit for the times.”

Technology and Governance
Jocelyne Bourgon, April 2014


“Technological innovations have contributed to transforming the world we live in. They have played a key role in human history. The effects of technological innovations are cumulative and transformative. There are often long gaps between discovery, early implementation and the moment when their full impact is revealed. The countries that ...

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“Technological innovations have contributed to transforming the world we live in. They have played a key role in human history. The effects of technological innovations are cumulative and transformative. There are often long gaps between discovery, early implementation and the moment when their full impact is revealed.

The countries that have been able to adapt to a changing world and to harness the potential of technological innovations have enjoyed some comparative advantages – temporarily. However, the countries that have performed the best in recent times may not be those that will adapt successfully to the challenges resulting from the coming together of globalisation and the revolution in digital communications.

Your lecture series proposes that, “digital communication is transforming political and public life.” Fair enough, but let’s explore what this may mean in practice; and in the process, let’s challenge some conventional ideas. After all, this is the role of a school like yours, dedicated to the study of public policy challenges.”

A Summary of Learning of the First NS Master Class Program Held in Singapore in March-May 2013
Jocelyne Bourgon, 2013


“The New Synthesis (NSLab) Laboratory was a ground-breaking experiment that took place in Singapore in spring 2013. It brought together “master practitioners” with the NS project leader to test the robustness of the NS Framework in a variety of domains of practice.

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“The New Synthesis (NSLab) Laboratory was a ground-breaking experiment that took place in Singapore in spring 2013. It brought together “master practitioners” with the NS project leader to test the robustness of the NS Framework in a variety of domains of practice.

The Story of the Singapore Prison Service: From Custodians of Prisoners to Captains of Life
Lena Leong, 2012


“The Singapore Prison Service (SPS) transformed itself from an agency focused on protecting society through the safe custody of criminals to a leader in rehabilitation. Between 1998 and 2009, the recidivism rate dropped significantly from 44.4% to 26.4%. The SPS is also one of the most cost-effective prison institutions in the world, with an ...

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“The Singapore Prison Service (SPS) transformed itself from an agency focused on protecting society through the safe custody of criminals to a leader in rehabilitation. Between 1998 and 2009, the recidivism rate dropped significantly from 44.4% to 26.4%. The SPS is also one of the most cost-effective prison institutions in the world, with an average cost of incarceration of $75 per day and an inmate-to-staff ration of 7.6:1. Yet, security and discipline have not been compromised: there have been no escapes or major riots, and the assault rate has been kept low. Staff morale has also been high, with about 81% of officers indicating their satisfaction with work in the organisation.

This case chronicles the change journey of the SPS: how a traditional command-control agency faced with challenges of an increasing prison population, high staff turnover and poor public perception, engaged its staff, stakeholders and eventually the community to create outcomes that changed the lives of inmates and their families. It illustrates a change that started within the organisation and cascaded outwards to the rest of the community.”

Organizing Government Around Problems: The Dutch Program Ministries for Youth and Family and for Housing, Communities and Integration
Martijn van der Steen, Philip Marcel Karré and Mark Van Twist, 2012


“All over the world, experiments are taking place with new kinds of organisational structures that facilitate the emergence of practices from society to address social issues. Government agencies are working together across portfolio boundaries to achieve an integrated government response to the wicked, unforeseen and continuously changing problems and dilemmas ...

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“All over the world, experiments are taking place with new kinds of organisational structures that facilitate the emergence of practices from society to address social issues. Government agencies are working together across portfolio boundaries to achieve an integrated government response to the wicked, unforeseen and continuously changing problems and dilemmas society faces. They do not seek to solve issues independently, but rather link up, align with or stimulate initiatives by other actors. In Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, this strategy has come to be known as joined-up government or the whole-of-government approach.

In this case study, we describe two such experiments in the Netherlands under the 2007-2010 cabinet: the Program Ministry for Youth and Family and the Program Ministry for Housing, Communities and Integration. What emerges is a picture of a public administration aimed at creating a resilient society (in which practices emerging from citizens are taken seriously), the way it functioned in practice, and the dilemmas it faced. The two case-organisations illustrate how new organisational modes (the program ministries) work in terms of day-to-day practice, but also how they work out in living up to expectations. These cases may contain valuable lessons for the transition towards a public service based on resilience and emergence.”

Collaborative Federalism: How Labour Mobility and Foreign Qualification Recognition are Changing Canada’s Intergovernmental Landscape
Don Lenihan, 2012


“This case study explores two intertwined issues that shape the experience of immigrants in the Canadian labour market: internal labour mobility (allowing skilled Canadians to practice their trades anywhere in the country) and foreign qualification recognition (FQR) (allowing new Canadians with qualifications attained abroad to practice in their chosen field ...

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“This case study explores two intertwined issues that shape the experience of immigrants in the Canadian labour market: internal labour mobility (allowing skilled Canadians to practice their trades anywhere in the country) and foreign qualification recognition (FQR) (allowing new Canadians with qualifications attained abroad to practice in their chosen field anywhere in Canada). Both parts of the story involve intersecting issues and multiple jurisdictions (the federal government, the provinces and territories, and the professional bodies that regulate their members’ qualifications).”

Australia’s New Federal Financial Agreement: Focusing on Better Results for Society
Australian Public Service Commission, 2012


“This case study focuses on Australia’s federal system and in particular a new intergovernmental agreement between the national and state governments that adopts a more collaborative approach to delivering outcomes for citizens. This paper begins with some background to provide a context for the reforms. It then discusses the ...

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“This case study focuses on Australia’s federal system and in particular a new intergovernmental agreement between the national and state governments that adopts a more collaborative approach to delivering outcomes for citizens. This paper begins with some background to provide a context for the reforms. It then discusses the development and structure of the Intergovernmental Agreement on Federal Financial Relations (which came into effect 1 January 2009) and follows with an analysis of elements of the National Education Agreement in relation to the performance and emergence quadrants of the New Synthesis model of public administration.”

Workfare in Singapore
Koh Tsin Yen and Pamela Qiu, 2011


“The case traces the evolution of Workfare in Singapore and illustrates Singapore’s approach to policy making. Active scanning for policy ideas and experiences from around the world enabled Singapore’s policy makers to adopt and adapt ideas to suit the local context. Testing the idea in incremental steps increased ...

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“The case traces the evolution of Workfare in Singapore and illustrates Singapore’s approach to policy making. Active scanning for policy ideas and experiences from around the world enabled Singapore’s policy makers to adopt and adapt ideas to suit the local context. Testing the idea in incremental steps increased acceptance and enabled refinements along the way, eventually leading to policy innovation.

The case also explores the following elements of the New Synthesis Framework:

  • The approach to building societal resilience by addressing the resilience of individuals and their families by encouraging work, enhancing employability and helping them grow assets for the future.
  • The involvement of other stakeholders of society to achieve societal outcomes, such as encouraging citizens who are able to work to find employment, upgrading their skills to stay in employment and providing incentives to employers to retain and re-train their employees.
  • The use of early and multiple policy interventions at various levels: for example, a combination of income supplements, subsidies and a range of initiatives to increase opportunities for low-wage workers.”
Vision, Collaboration, Persistence, and Hard Work: The Canadian Federal Government’s Homelessness Partnering Strategy
Andrew Graham, 2011


“This is the case of the federal government of Canada’s role in addressing homelessness. The story offers an overview of how one level of government leveraged limited resources to help align and bind together the considerable and varied efforts of three levels of government, the not-for-profit sector and individuals ...

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“This is the case of the federal government of Canada’s role in addressing homelessness. The story offers an overview of how one level of government leveraged limited resources to help align and bind together the considerable and varied efforts of three levels of government, the not-for-profit sector and individuals to tackle a growing and complex public problem.”

National Health Conferences and Participatory Processes in the Brazilian Federal Public Administration
Elisabete Ferrarezi and Mariana S. De Carvalho Oliveira, 2011


“This case about National Health Conferences aims to support the debate about participatory processes and the emergence of new patterns of relationship between State and society. Under the framework of the New Synthesis Project, it relates especially to the cocnpets of governance, emergence and resilience. This paper tries to demonstrate ...

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“This case about National Health Conferences aims to support the debate about participatory processes and the emergence of new patterns of relationship between State and society. Under the framework of the New Synthesis Project, it relates especially to the cocnpets of governance, emergence and resilience. This paper tries to demonstrate the advancements, dilemmas and potential of participatory mechanisms, comparing the examples of the 13th National Health Conference (13th NHC) held in 2007, and the 8th National Health Conference of 1986 (8th NHC).”

Victoria Bushfire Reconstruction and Recovery Authority: A Case Study on Agility and Resilience
State Services Authority, Government of Victoria, 2011


“The Victorian Bushfire Reconstruction and Recovery Authority (VBRRA) was established in February 2009 as a time-limited government agency in the state of Victoria charged with co-ordinating the initial two-year phase of recovery and reconstruction following the most devastating bushfires in Australia’s history. The scale and urgency of the recovery task ...

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“The Victorian Bushfire Reconstruction and Recovery Authority (VBRRA) was established in February 2009 as a time-limited government agency in the state of Victoria charged with co-ordinating the initial two-year phase of recovery and reconstruction following the most devastating bushfires in Australia’s history. The scale and urgency of the recovery task created an imperative for public sector agility and responsiveness that involved VBRRA taking on high priority operational roles in a complex operating environment that crossed jurisdictional, portfolio and sectoral boundaries. The VBRRA’s recovery and reconstruction framework puts local communities at its centre. Community-led recovery presents challenges, including time costs and resource costs for building capacity. However, its rewards lie in better decision making and stronger community recovery. Community-led recovery also has the potential to strengthen the resilience of communities and their capacity to foresee and adapt to future changes.”

SARS Revisited: Insights from Singapore
Dr. K. U. Menon, 2011


“This case study looks at the way the SARS [Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome] was managed and attempts to sieve out the capabilities that enabled Singapore to respond to the pandemic. It will tell the story through examples and descriptions of issues, the motivations, constraints and objectives of people, groups, organisations ...

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“This case study looks at the way the SARS [Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome] was managed and attempts to sieve out the capabilities that enabled Singapore to respond to the pandemic. It will tell the story through examples and descriptions of issues, the motivations, constraints and objectives of people, groups, organisations and systems engaged in the pandemic response.”

Rotterdam Tarwewijk, A Resilient Neighbourhood?
Bart Litjens, Mark Rouw, Rob Hammenga and Igno Pröper, 2011


“Since 1994, Dutch municipalities and the national government have been investing significant sums in cities and urban renewal under the banner of ‘metropolitan policy’. The primary focus in those policies is the physical environment, such as the quality of houses and residential areas, followed by social cohesion within neighbourhoods. The mantra ‘...

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“Since 1994, Dutch municipalities and the national government have been investing significant sums in cities and urban renewal under the banner of ‘metropolitan policy’. The primary focus in those policies is the physical environment, such as the quality of houses and residential areas, followed by social cohesion within neighbourhoods. The mantra ‘clean, intact and safe’ has dominated many policy plans and implementation plans since that time. After 2008, the emphasis shifted to social engagement by the people. The focus was primarily the development opportunities available to people through participation (or the option of participation) in work, education, the housing market, public facilities and leisure activities.”

Public Safety Centers in the Netherlands
Jouke de Vries, Harry Kruiter and Martin Gagner, 2011


“Unheard of a decade ago, Public Safety Centres (PSCs) are a recent and relatively unknown phenomenon within the Dutch public sector. While the first was formed in 2002, there are now 47 PSCs across the Netherlands, with most having emerged over the past two years. This study aspires to shed some light ...

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“Unheard of a decade ago, Public Safety Centres (PSCs) are a recent and relatively unknown phenomenon within the Dutch public sector. While the first was formed in 2002, there are now 47 PSCs across the Netherlands, with most having emerged over the past two years. This study aspires to shed some light on the processes relating to the PSCs and how they have come to be viewed as an effective tool in dealing with complex challenges relating to public safety.”

The Brazilian Innovation Award: Identifying Government Practices that Contribute to the Improvement of Service Delivery
Clarice G. Oliveira, 2011


“To promote innovation in public administration is considered a strategy to generate improvements in the quality of services provided to citizens and for the strengthening of democratic principles to benefit society. Innovation promotion actions include awarding teams and organisations. In Brazil, the National School of Public Administration is sponsoring the ...

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“To promote innovation in public administration is considered a strategy to generate improvements in the quality of services provided to citizens and for the strengthening of democratic principles to benefit society. Innovation promotion actions include awarding teams and organisations. In Brazil, the National School of Public Administration is sponsoring the Brazilian Innovation in Federal Public Management Award to recognise innovative practices of proven efficacy that have contributed to increase the capacity of the government and the quality of services delivered.”

Citizen-Centered Public Services: Designing for Complex Outcomes.
Tim Hughes and Sue Richards, 2011


“A centrally driven approach may be best when the goal is to deliver narrowly defined services. For example, a single and very efficient vehicle registration system that operates in a self-contained way offers the best value. But this approach is not the way to solve complex social problems. A more ...

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“A centrally driven approach may be best when the goal is to deliver narrowly defined services. For example, a single and very efficient vehicle registration system that operates in a self-contained way offers the best value. But this approach is not the way to solve complex social problems. A more holistic and less mechanistic approach that integrates multiple contributions is needed. Grappling with the conundrum of inconsistent design principles has led to various initiatives over the years to get the best of both worlds so that the specialisation and integration mix in an optimal way, with central government providing strategic leadership rather than micro management.

This case study explores three such initiatives, one at the national or macro level and two at the local or micro level. Each illustrates the issues involved as government tackles complex issues through more holistic, integrated and participatory responses.”

Bolsa Família Program: Funding Families for Development
Frederico Guanais, 2011


“Brazil faces enormous challenges: it is the fifth largest country in the world and home to deep income inequality. It is also extraordinarily complex to govern: co-ordination is needed among 26 states, 5,564 municipal governments and one federal district—each of vastly differing capacity but subject to the same rules governing the ...

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“Brazil faces enormous challenges: it is the fifth largest country in the world and home to deep income inequality. It is also extraordinarily complex to govern: co-ordination is needed among 26 states, 5,564 municipal governments and one federal district—each of vastly differing capacity but subject to the same rules governing the implementation of public policy. Municipalities, for instance, have populations that range from 800 people to 11 million people and a total yearly GDP that ranges from US$1,000 to US$77 million.

Yet despite these challenges of size, poverty, and complexity, recent Brazilian governments have pursued simultaneous agendas of social inclusion, reduction of inequality, strengthening of democracy, macroeconomic stability and acceleration of sustainable growth.

This case study presents one of these initiatives: Bolsa Família, a program of conditional cash transfer to poor families. It is an enormous undertaking that has made important strides in addressing poverty and complexity in Brazil’s reality.”

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